10 Travel Quotes to Get You Inspired!

If you’re thinking about taking some time to travel this year but are still undecided, then check out these inspiring travel quotes. They’ll be sure to get you in the mood!

To travel is to discover that everyone is wrong about other countries.” – Aldous Huxley

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you did not do than by the ones you did do.” – Mark Twain

Perhaps travel can not prevent bigotry, but by demonstrating that all peoples cry, laugh, eat, worry, and die, it can introduce the idea that if we try to understand each other, we may even become friends.” – Maya Angelou

A ship in harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for” – John A. Shedd

I like animals. I like natural history. The travel bit is not the important bit. The travel bit is what you have to do in order to go and look at animals.” – David Attenborough

A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving.” – Lao Tzu

You lose sight of things… and when you travel, everything balances out.” – Daranna Gidel

To my mind, the greatest reward and luxury of travel is to be able to experience everyday things as if for the first time, to be in a position in which almost nothing is so familiar it is taken for granted.” – Bill Bryson

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.” – Steve Jobs

Stop worrying about the potholes in the road and celebrate the journey.” – Fitzhugh Mullan

Above are some of the most inspirational quotes that I have ever come across. I hope you find them as inspirational, and that it makes you want to live your life and travel.

4 Things To Do In Forence. Art In Hostel.

4 Things In Florence

If you’ve only got a few days in Florence, you’ll want to pack in as many sights as you can. So once you’ve checked in at the hostel, dropped your bags off in the room and headed off into the city, what should you go and see?

Santa Maria del Fiore Cathedral (aka il Duomo)

The world’s 4th largest cathedral. Construction began in 1296: such a gravity-defying design, with a dome that size, had not been attempted since the building of the Pantheon. Filippo Brunelleschi took up the “Duomo” challenge in 1418, devising some new building techniques along the way, but sadly, he died before the final stages of construction were completed. The cathedral is completely covered with green, white and pink marble (now sparkling after a recent clean) and the interior is adorned with incredible frescoes and Donatello’s stained glass windows. The “Campanile di Giotto” (the bell tower), is the most striking feature of any view of the city: Giotto, the famous painter and architect designed the tower, however, by his death, in 1337, only the lowest part had been completed.

 

Palazzo Vecchio

The most important civil building in town. Pay the entry fee to see some of the best preserved ceiling frescoes, or just stick your head in the front door to take a snoop!

Ponte Vecchio

One of the three bridges in the world occupied by shops, and Florence’s oldest. Spared from destruction during

WWII because of its age and artistic relevance, it has withstood floods and hordes of tourists during the centuries and the dazzling jewellers you see today are a far cry from the stinky butcher shops and blacksmiths that originally occupied it. Above the shops, there is a hidden walkway, linking Palazzo Pitti to the Uffizi, once used by the Medici family to avoid the public.

 

Santa Croce Church

It contains the monumental tombs of Galileo, Michelangelo, Machiavelli, and many other legendary artists. Visit the

historical workshops in the narrow street in front of the church, to see how some antique arts of the renaissance, such as mosaics and ceramics are still practiced today.